Te hono

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Te Hono ki Aotearoa: The Link to Aotearoa

4:30pm for guided tour of He Tohu. 5pm for 5:30pm–7:30pm introduction and film screening. , Tuesday 20 February 2018

Free but booking required.

Programme Rooms, Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets

Join us for an extraordinary film about an extraordinary intercultural partnership

Ahead of the New Zealand Festival opening night waka odyssey on Wellington Harbour, the National Library, Toi Māori Aotearoa, and the Dutch Embassy have come together to present a film tracing an extraordinary intercultural partnership.

Te Hono ki Aotearoa (82 minutes, directed by Jan Bieringa) follows the journey of a waka taua (ceremonial canoe) hewn from a 600-year-old kauri and ceremonially gifted, on permanent loan, to the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden, Holland.

  • A pre-event tour of He Tohu will be available.
  • The film will be introduced by Tamahou Temara from Toi Māori Aotearoa, the Dutch Embassy, and filmmaker Jan Bieringa.
  • After the film, there'll be refreshments and an informal discussion with questions and answers.

Film backstory

After hosting a successful exhibition on Māori culture, Steven Engelsman, the director of Leiden's Museum Volkenkunde, wanted to create a permanent connection between Aotearoa and Holland. So he broached the idea of housing a waka permanently in the museum.

What follows is the story of the building and the handing over of Te Hono ki Aotearoa (The Link to Aotearoa), a waka taua (ceremonial canoe) on permanent loan to the Dutch museum, and the first exchange of its kind.

The waka was carved by a team led by master carver, Takirirangi Smith and constructed under the skilled guidance of master waka builder Hekenukmai (Hec) Busby. Hec saw the exchange as the beginning of something bigger. A man who 'loves playing with wood' (this was his 27th waka), Hec is quietly proud in his assertion that "the waka is number one in our culture".

One of the film's many highlights shows the waka's reception by its Dutch guardians on 18 October 2010. It was a gorgeous ceremony where Maori and Dutch joined together in passionately enacting the ceremonial rituals.

The Te Hono ki Aotearoa waka being paddled as part of the ceremony,watched over by crowd includinng Māori in tradional costume, holding paddles

Toi Māori Aotearoa Māori Arts New Zealand logo

Kingdom of the Netherlands logo

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Suffrage symbol

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Fight for suffrage and the Empire

12:10 to 1pm, Wednesday 28 February 2018

Free – booking is not required

Programme Rooms, Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets

It is often said that New Zealand women ‘fought’ a battle for the vote, while their role in World War One has been largely overlooked. New Zealand vaunts its famous first of women’s suffrage, but not the firsts of the war, for example:

  • the first woman doctor in a British military medical unit
  • the first member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service
  • some of the first-ever OBEs and MBEs.

In this talk, Jane Tolerton explores how the feminist 1890s fuelled female ambition and how this was expressed in the fight for suffrage and in the 1914–1918 war. The latter included all-female Scottish Women’s Hospital units largely funded by British suffrage societies, which were still waiting to get the vote.

About the speaker

Jane Tolerton is the author of:

  • Make her praises heard afar: New Zealand Women overseas in World War One
  • An awfully big adventure, and
  • Ettie Rout: New Zealand’s safer sex pioneer.

Dr Mary Blair In SalonikaDr Mary Blair in Salonika 'Muggins is bored'. Image courtesy Maryanne Blair.

For more information, email events.natlib@dia.govt.nz

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